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AnalyticProvenanceWorkshop

The Analytic Provenance Community is proud to announce:

Analytic Provenance: Process + Interaction + Insight

Workshop at CHI 2011 in Vancouver, BC

May 7-8, 2011




What is Analytic Provenance and the workshop about

Visual analytics is the science of analytical reasoning facilitated by interactive visual interfaces. One key aspect that separates visual analytics from other related fields (InfoVis, SciVis, HCI) is the focus on analytical reasoning. While the final products generated at from an analytical process are of great value, research has shown that the processes of the analysis themselves are just as important if not more so. These processes not only contain information on individual insights discovered, but also how the users arrive at these insights. This area of research that focuses on understanding a user’s reasoning process through the study of their interactions with a visualization is called Analytic Provenance, and has demonstrated great potential in becoming a foundation of the science of visual analytics. The goal of this workshop is to provide a forum for researchers and practitioners from academia, national labs, and industry to share methods for capturing, storing, and reusing user interactions and insights. We aim to develop a research agenda for how to better study analytic provenance and utilize the results in assisting users in solving real world problems.

How can I get involved

While the workshop may be over the work is still underway. On this page you can find the position papers, the activities conducted at the workshop, and some results from the discussions.

The workshop was a great success and follow on activities are being planned. Keep an eye on this site as these ideas develop. There are forums and a growing collection of pages on the Analytics Provenance Community home page.

We encourage everyone interested in analytic provenance to get involved and help advance analytic provenance research.

Workshop Participants and Position Statements

Authors:Richard Arias-Hernandez, Brian Fisher
Paper: Analytic Provenance in Pair Analytics
Presentation:

Authors: Mike Capsambelis
Paper: Making Sense of the Sensemaking Processes
Presentation:

Authors: Tarik Crnovrsanin, Chris Muelder, Yingcai Wu, Kwan-Liu Ma
Paper: Visual Collaboration Analysis for Exploration Guidance
Presentation:

Authors: Jason Dykes, Jo Wood, Aidan Slingsby
Paper: Sharing Graphics and Insights with Microblogs
Presentation:

Authors: Jean-Daniel Fekete, Wael Khemiri, Ioana Manolescu, Véronique Benzaken
Paper: Provenance Management in the EdiFlow VA Workflow
Presentation:

Authors: Tera M. Green, Dustin Dunsmuir, Eric Lee, Nazanin Kadivar, John Dill, Brian Fisher
Paper: Analytic Provenance for Collaborative Cognition with CZSaw
Presentation:

Authors: Eben M. Haber
Paper: On the Need for Formal Languages in Visual Analytics
Presentation:

Authors: Petra Isenberg and Danyel Fisher
Paper: Pairgrams: Understanding Collaborative Analysis Behavior with Visualization
Presentation:

Authors: T.J. Jankun-Kelly
Paper: The Case for Visual Analysis Provenance Cases
Presentation:

Authors: Jennifer Lai, Jie Lu
Paper: Analytic Trails: Supporting Provenance, Collaboration, and Reuse in Visual Data Analysis
Presentation:

Authors: Laura McNamara and Nancy Orlando-Gay
Paper: Reading, Sorting, Shuffling, Ruminating, Revising: Analytic Strategies for Categorizing Information
Presentation:

Authors: Sean M. McNee, Julianne Bryant, Nick Nussbaum, Steve Antoch, Ben Arnette, Bill Knight
Paper: The Analytic Provenance of Attorneys during E-Discovery
Presentation:

Authors: Adam Perer
Paper: Position Paper
Presentation:

Authors: Roman Pyzh, Cynthia Gibas, Robert Kosara
Paper: Provenance Analysis in Comparative Genomics
Presentation:

Authors: Jean Scholtz and Kristin A. Cook
Paper: Intelligence Analysis and Visual Analytics
Presentation:

Authors: William J. Valdez, Julia Lane
Paper: Visual Analytics and The Science of Science Policy: Insights Into Understanding Discovery and Innovation
Presentation:

Authors: Chris Weaver, Maryam Nafari
Paper: Capturing Connotation in Interactive Visualization
Presentation:

Authors: B.L. William Wong, Kai Xu, Simon Attfield
Paper: Provenance for Intelligence Analysis using Visual Analytics
Presentation:

Workshop Agenda

This is a draft agenda and we are looking for comments and suggestions to make this the best workshop it can be. Please send comments directly to the organizers or post a response to the workshop agenda forum topic.

Day 1 morning
0900h – 0915h (15 min): Workshop intro and administrivia
0915h – 0930h (15 min): “Big Picture” on AP presentation

Participant Position Statements:
Names listed are the first authors on position papers and not necessarily the ones presenting.

0930h – 1010h (40 min): The need for Analytic Provenance (forum notes)
• Jankun-Kelly - The Case for Visual Analysis Provenance Cases (Call for action)
• M. Capsambelis, Shaun Moon, Scott Potter - Analytic Provenance: Making Sense of the Sensemaking Processes
• Wong – Provenance for Intelligence Analysis using Visual Analytics
• Valdez – Visual Analytics & The Science of Science Policy: Insights into Understanding Discovery & Innovation
• 10 minute discussion

1010h – 1045h (35 min): Provenance capturing and management (forum notes)
• Scholtz - Intelligence Analysis and Visual Analytics
• Fekete - Provenance management in the EdiFlow VA Workflow
• Weaver - Capturing Connotation in Interactive Visualization
• Pyzh - Provenance Analysis in Comparative Genomics
• Haber - On the Need for Formal Languages in Visual Analytics
• 10 minute discussion

1045h – 1115h (30 min): BREAK

1115h – 1150h (35 min): Provenance in use (during visual data analysis) (forum notes)
• Lai – Analytic Trails: Supporting Provenance, Collaboration, and Reuse in Visual Data Analysis (Proxy by Remco)
• McNamara - Reading, Sorting, Shuffling, Ruminating, Revising: Analytic Strategies for Categorizing Information
• Perer - Position Paper: Analytic Provenance Workshop (long-term study)
• McNee - The Analytic Provenance of Attorneys during E-Discovery
• 10 minute discussion

1150h – 1230h (40 min): Provenance for collaborative visual analytics (Provenance for sharing) (forum notes)
• Isenberg - Pairgrams: Understanding Collaborative Analysis Behavior with Visualization
• Arias-Hernandez - Analytic Provenance in Pair Analytics
• Dykes - Sharing Graphics and Insights with Microblogs
• Green - Analytic Provenance for Collaborative Cognition with CZSaw
• Crnovrsanin - Visual Collaboration Analysis for Exploration Guidance
• 10 minute discussion

1230h – 1400h (90 min): Lunch

Day 1 Afternoon
1400h – 1530h (90 min): Analyst — Deborah Beall (Intel Corp): views, perspectives, Q&A

1530h – 1600h (30 min): BREAK

1600h – 1725h (85 min): Technology Demonstrations
Demonstrations will focus on how the tools support analytic provenance concepts
1. Demo 1: CZSAW — Dustin Dunsmuir
2. Demo 2: CoMotion — Shaun Moon, Scott Potter

1725h – 1730h (5 min): Close out of Day 1

DINNER at The Old Spaghetti Factory

Day 2 Morning
0900h – 0915h (15 min): Defining and assign groups for Day 2 morning

0915h – 1030h (75 min): Break into four groups. Each developing a definition or description of analytic provenance.

1030h - 1100h (30 min): BREAK

1100h – 1200h (60 min): reports and discussions

1200h – 1330h (90 min) LUNCH

Day 2 Afternoon
1330h – 1400h (30 min): selection of "next step" topics and assign groups
    • Development of second workshop on AP
    • Technology gap analysis paper
    • Special issue or book on AP
    • Funding proposal development
1400h – 1600h (120 min): Group Discussions
(Break 1445h - 1515h)

1600h – 1730h (90 min): reports and discussions of groups

1730h – 1800h (30 min): wrap up and close out

Workshop Organizers

Chris North is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Virginia Tech, where he is head of the Laboratory for Information Visualization and Evaluation. His research is in the areas of human-computer interaction, information visualization, large high- resolution displays, and visualization evaluation methods. His current work examines how analytic insight relates to analytic process and user interaction. He is particularly interested in how large high-resolution displays can be used to better support capturing, viewing, and reusing analytic provenance.

Remco Chang is an assistant professor at Tufts University whose research includes information visualization, visual analytics, and computer graphics. His ongoing collaboration with Bank of America on risk analysis gave him exposure to how financial analysts perform fraud detection, and led him to study methods for capturing and reusing these analytical procedures.

Alex Endert is a Ph.D. student at Virginia Tech. His work focuses on visual analytics and visualization, and how these apply to large displays. Ongoing collaboration with intelligence analysts at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has led him to pursue how large displays enable fundamentally different interactions, namely spatial interaction, organization, and querying.

Wenwen Dou is a Ph.D. student at University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Her research is in the areas of visual analytics and human-computer interaction. Her current work focuses on exploring the relationship between analytic provenance and user interaction. She is also working on developing visualization systems and interaction techniques for program officers at NSF to make sense of research trends and science policies.

Richard May is a chief scientist at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Director of the National Visualization and Analytics Center (NVAC). His research focus for the past several years has been in visual analytics and interaction methodologies. His particular interest is the logical and physical aspects of interacting with information for analytical tasks using visual analytic techniques. He manages both research and development projects as well as outreach programs to government, industry, and academia.

William Pike is a senior research scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory where he focuses on visual analytics, analytic methods, and visualization for data-intensive computing. He has developed techniques for capturing analysis processes and recording insight in visualization software, and he works extensively with end users to integrate support for analytic workflows into visualization software.

Glenn A. Fink has been a Senior Research Scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington since 2006. Dr. Fink specializes in computer security, visualization, and human-centric computing, centering computer systems’ design and function around the needs and abilities of people. Dr. Fink is conducting ongoing research at PNNL in adaptive computer security systems with a human- centric point of view.

Advisory Board

Chaomei Chen
Drexel University

Joe Kielman
U.S. Department of Homeland Security

Israel Lederhendler
National Institute of Health

John David Miller
Intel Corporation


Page last modified on Thursday, September 15, 2011

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